Chemical elements
  Palladium
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Palladous Fluoride
      Palladous Chloride
      Dichlor-palladous Acid
      Tetrachlor-palladites
      Palladium Trichloride
      Pentachlor-palladates
      Hexachlor-palladates
      Palladous Bromide
      Brom-palladites
      Brom-palladates
      Palladous Iodide
      Palladous Oxide
      Hydrated Palladium Sesquioxide
      Hydrated Palladium Dioxide
      Palladium Subsulphide
      Palladium Monosulphide
      Potassium Thio-palladite
      Palladium Disulphide
      Sodium Thio-palladate
      Palladous Sulphate
      Palladous Selenide
      Palladous Selenate
      Palladous Nitrate
      Palladium Cyanide
      Potassium Palladocyanide
      Palladium Monosilicide
    Catalytic Activity
    Types
    PDB 1ks4-3np2

Brom-palladates, M2PdBr6






Although palladium tetrabromide is not known, compounds of the type M2PdBr6, termed brom-palladates, have been prepared. Of these the most important is:


Potassium Brom-palladate K2PdBr6

Potassium Brom-palladate K2PdBr6, which is precipitated from a solution of potassium brom-palladite on passing through it a current of bromine vapour. It also results on oxidising a solution of the brom- palladite with potassium persulphate in the presence of hydrobromic acid. It crystallises in beautiful black octahedra, which dissolve sparingly in water, yielding a reddish brown solution.

Boiling water and hot concentrated sulphuric acid each decompose the salt, bromine being evolved. Ammonia is immediately decomposed by it, with evolution of nitrogen.

Ammonium Brom-palladate, (NH4)2PdBr6

Ammonium Brom-palladate, (NH4)2PdBr6, is obtained in a similar manner to the preceding salt, ice-cold solutions being employed. The salt crystallises in black, regular octahedra, which are stable in air and sparingly soluble in cold water, yielding a reddish brown solution. Upon heating in a dry tube, bromine vapour is at first evolved, ammonium bromide next sublimes, and a residue of palladium sponge remains behind. Towards hot water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia the salt behaves in an analogous manner to the preceding salt.
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